| Home | BGS news | Health | Breeds | Breeding | Feeding | Housing | Goat Farming | F.A.Q. | Publications |
| Books and Downloads | Fees and Forms | BGS online | BGS Forum | Contacts | Links |

BRITISH GOAT SOCIETY

Goat Breeds

Anglo Nubian Golden & British Guernsey Angora Bagot
British Alpine Saanen Boer Harness
British Saanen British  Cashmere Pygmy
British Toggenburg Toggenburg
English
 
GOLDEN & BRITISH GUERNSEY

 

The Golden Guernsey, as the name implies, is a golden colour with medium gold being the most common, but the golden colour can vary from a pale blonde to a deep bronze. The length of a coat can vary considerably, but generally there is some fringing. The Golden Guernsey was first imported to England in 1965 and a closed Herd Book is used for registration, but the British Guernsey is a breed being created from other breeds by the continual use of Golden Guernsey males on successive generations of female progeny. Swiss markings are forbidden in both breeds, but small white markings are allowed.

Golden Guernsey goats are smaller than the British dairy breeds, fine boned, and are generally quiet and docile. In many respects they are ideal “household” goats. They have a good yield when this is related to their size, and quite sufficient for most households. The milk is relatively high in fat and protein to make it suitable for yoghurt and cheese. 

The British Guernsey is slightly larger that the Golden Guernsey and is not easily distinguished from the parent breed. 

An average 24 hours yield of 3.16 Kg. at 3.72% butterfat and 2.81% protein was obtained by considering data from all Golden Guernsey/British Guernsey goats entered in B.G.S. recognised milking trials in a recent year (272 performances). Very few of the samples were from British Guernsey goats. 

Visit the Golden Guernsey Goat Society website for further details about Golden Guernsey goats: http://www.goldenguernseygoat.org.uk/

SAANEN

 

This is a white goat, which gets its name from the Saanen valley in Switzerland, where selective breeding of dairy goats has taken place for several hundred years. 

The Saanens in the UK started with an importation of goats from Holland in 1922, and these had an enormous influence on the development of British goats.
Since 1922, there have been importation of goats from Switzerland in 1965, semen from Switzerland in 1993 and goats from Holland in 1997/98. 

Saanens in the UK, according to the British Goat Society Breed Standards, should have “good length and depth, without legginess”.  The goats have a short fine coat and supple skin and a distinctly feminine head, which may be straight or dished. There are relatively few Saanens in the UK, but they have a quiet nature, can milk well and have qualities used with great advantage in improving British Saanens.

An average 24 hours yield of 4.29 Kg. at 3.58% butterfat and 2.66% protein was obtained by considering data from all Saanen goats entered in B.G.S. recognised milking trials in a recent year (205 performances).

TOGGENBURG

 

This is a breed originating in Switzerland within an area centred on the Obertoggenburg and Werdenburg valleys, with goats reaching the UK from 1882 onwards. The Toggenburg section of the B.G.S. Herd Book was opened in 1905, the first breed to have its own section. There were importations of goats from Switzerland in 1922, 1965 and semen in 1993.

 

The goat has good length and depth, without legginess. Although smaller in stature than its British counterpart it is usually a strong goat with sound conformation. Its colour can range from mid-brown to shades of grey or fawn, with white Swiss markings. The head is distinctive, being wide across the level of the eyes, and having a dished face. The hair can be any length, but fringing is usually present to some degree and the coat is silky in texture. 

An average 24 hours yield of 3.61 Kg. at 3.70% butterfat and 2.71% protein was obtained by considering data from all Toggenburg goats entered in B.G.S. recognised milking trials in a recent year (195 performances).
Web site: http://www.toggenburg-breedersociety.co.uk

BRITISH

This is the term used to describe goats that are registered with the British Goat Society, but are not eligible for a breed section. It is possible to “grade up” to some of the Breed sections when the pedigree is sufficiently “pure”. Grading up is not possible with Golden Guernsey, Saanen or Toggenburg. It is sometimes the case that crosses between pure breeds are made with a specific long term objective, or alternatively previously unregistered females can be registered as a starting point. Goats in this section can be any colour and often have a great deal of hybrid vigour. British goats are judged entirely on their conformation and milking qualities. Many of the UK’s highest yielding goats and also show Champions are in this section. 

 

It has proved to be a most important section of the Herd Book in improving the National herd.

An average 24 hours yield of 4.66 Kg. at 3.64% butterfat and 2.721% protein was obtained by considering data from all British goats entered in B.G.S. recognised milking trials in a recent year (906 performances).

ENGLISH

 

The aim is to breed a utility goat with all the qualities, which make an ideal smallholders animal, suited to the British climate and vegetation. The female should efficiently convert the latter into a moderate milk supply, over a long period, without the need for large amounts of concentrated feeds. 

Coat colour is variable, mainly brown or grey, with a characteristic dark line "eel stripe" along the back. There are usually dark markings on head, legs and flanks; white patches are permitted, but Swiss markings are ideally absent.

Hair length varies, frequently being longer in males. An underdown is often grown in winter. Hardiness, a sturdy body and a docile temperament, are important. The registration of English goats is carried out by the English Goat Breeders Association, a Registered Charity affiliated to the British Goat Society. Recent development of the breed has been largely due to selective breeding and inspection for type before registration. Some shows hold English classes; BGS recognised milking trials are available to English goats registered in the BGS Identification Register.

Further information from the EGBA Secretary, Mrs Annette Monument Tel: 01296 640842

| Home | BGS news | Health | Breeds | Breeding | Feeding | Housing | Goat Farming | F.A.Q. | Publications |
| Books and Downloads | Fees and Forms | BGS online | BGS Forum | Contacts | Links |